Tourism, poaching and wildlife conservation: what can integrated conservation and development projects accomplish?

Tourism, poaching and wildlife conservation: what can integrated conservation and development projects accomplish?

Examination of interaction between protected wildlife area managers and locals proves ambiguous

This paper examines Integrated Conservation and Development Projects (ICDPs), which have frequently been established in Africa to improve wildlife conservation and the welfare of local communities. The authors claim, however, that their effectiveness so far has been hampered by conflicts and illegal harvesting activities.

Within a Gordon-Schäfer-type model, this paper focuses on the strategic interaction between the manager of a protected area and a group of local people living near the park. The authors argue that the park manager benefits from wildlife through non-consumptive tourism and safari hunting, and suggest that the local people benefit through hunting, although this is illegal according to existing laws. However, local people also bear costs as wildlife causes agricultural damage.

The authors conclude that depending on the economic and ecological environment, ICDPs relying on money transfers to the local people derived from the park manager’s activities may or may not promote wildlife conservation, and the effects on the welfare of the local people are ambiguous.