Modern wildlife conservation initiatives and the pastoralist/hunter nomads of north western Tibet

Modern wildlife conservation initiatives and the pastoralist/hunter nomads of north western Tibet

Human wildlife interactions and wildlide conservation in north west Tibet

This paper reports on a Norwegian lead collaborative research project examining human-wildlife interactions and conservation priorities in the western part of the Chang Tang Nature Preserve, north-western Tibet.

Highlights of the paper include:

  • within the western part of the Chang Tang nature preserve, there exist rapidly diminishing populations of chiru antelope and wild yaks
  • an estimated 30,000 nomadic pastoralists use areas within the reserve for livestock grazing, with many dependent on hunting for supplementary subsistence and trade
  • North western Change Tang, with the Aru basin as a prime site, represents one of the last strongholds of the endangered chiru and wild yak, as well as home to the Tibetan gazelle, kiang, Tibetan argali and blue sheep
  • the Aru basin is unique in that nomads have only recently returned to the previously off-limits area
  • wildlife development actions in other parts of the Tibetan plateau are promoting increased livestock production, but they are doing so at the expense of wildlife
  • people’s lives within the Aru basin are undergoing changes recently influenced by the introduction of permanent winter houses, fluctuating international trade in cashmere wool and moves towards stricter hunting regulations.

[adapted from author]

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