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Searching with a thematic focus on Tax administration and compliance, Taxation in Uganda

Showing 1-4 of 4 results

  • Document

    Property taxation in Kampala, Uganda: an analytic case study on a successful reform

    International Centre for Tax and Development, 2018
    Kampala’s revenue reforms offer lessons that large and powerful cities should not wait for national actions, rather, they can do a lot “in-house” to improve tax administration, coverage, and collection. Against the rather poor performance of the property tax in Uganda, Kampala’s reforms have resulted in unprecedented increase of own-source revenues generally and the property tax specifically.
  • Document

    What can we learn from the Uganda Revenue Authority’s approach to taxing high net worth individuals?

    International Centre for Tax and Development, 2018
    Wealthy people contribute a significant share of the total revenue collected through personal income tax (PIT) in high-income countries. This is not the case in most low-income countries, where the bulk of revenue from PIT is collected from people who are in formal employment, especially in the public sector. In most cases, PIT is collected by employers and remitted to the tax authority.
  • Document

    Boosting revenue collection through taxing high net worth individuals: the case of Uganda

    International Centre for Tax and Development, 2016
    For over a decade Uganda’s tax-to-GDP ratio hovered between 12 per cent and 13 per cent, despite various amendments to tax laws and reforms in tax administration.
  • Document

    People’s views of taxation in Africa: a review of research on determinants of tax compliance

    International Centre for Tax and Development, 2012
    What are the key determinants of taxpayer compliance? And which features of citizen-state relations govern attitudes and behaviour regarding taxation? This paper examines the analytical foundation, methodological approaches and key findings of available empirical literature on taxpayer behaviour in Africa.