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  • Document

    What Institutional Framework for the Informal Sector ?

    OECD Development Centre, 1995
    Many micro-enterprises are known to the authorities, in particular because they pay taxes. Intermediate-revenue countries impose certain standards to protect consumers.Wages regulations are only rarely respected. The creation and development of micro-enterprises could be assisted by institutional reforms.
  • Document

    Pension Fund Investment from Ageing to Emerging Markets

    OECD Development Centre, 1994
    The rapid ageing of populations in the rich economies can be expected to stimulate strong growth in private funded pensions, providing a massive potential of foreign finance for developing countries. Pension managers can reap big diversification benefits by investing on the emerging stock markets of the younger economies, benefits which are largely unexploited so far.
  • Document

    The Disarmament Dividend: Challenges for Development Policy

    OECD Development Centre, 1994
    In 1990-1991, world wide military expenditure amounted to $950 billion. This bill could be reduced by the year 2000 by over $300 billion. Excessive military expenditure jeopardizes development prospects. Policies to achieve transparency and to strengthen military security arrangements should be a priority.
  • Document

    Employment Creation and Development Strategy

    OECD Development Centre, 1993
    Developing countries will account for almost all the increase in the world's labour force over the next 25 years; most countries, especially in Africa, will experience very rapid labour force growth. Labour-intensive development has been spectacularly successful in some countries and others have begun to emulate them.
  • Document

    Towards Sustainable Development in Rural Africa

    OECD Development Centre, 1999
    A growing recognition of the need to delimit the role of the government, to promote the market framework, and to rely on the private sector as the engine of growth, offers the prospect of a new beginning in rural development in Africa.
  • Document

    Trade Liberalisation: What 's at Stake ?

    OECD Development Centre, 1992
    Trade barriers seriously distort patterns of international trade, allocation of resources, and economic growth. The total economic costs of the barriers are estimated to exceed $475 billion per annum. Partial reform, such as envisaged in the Uruguay Round, would yield benefits of $195 billion per annum, of which over $90 billion would accrue to developing and formerly centrally planned countries.
  • Document

    Towards Capital Account Convertibility

    OECD Development Centre, 1992
    Advanced developing countries are increasingly encouraged to remove existing capital controls, but mixed experiences with capital account opening caution that reform must be carefully designed to increase efficiency and growth without compromising stability.
  • Document

    Privatisation in Developing Countries: Reflections on a Panacea

    OECD Development Centre, 1992
    Public enterprise privatisation policies have aroused enormous interest during the past decade. The majority of both developed and developing countries, and more recently the countries of Eastern and Central Europe, have launched ambitious programmes for transferring public sector property to the private sector.
  • Document

    Managing the environment in developing countries

    OECD Development Centre, 1992
    Environmental policy should be inspired by the recognition that the environment is everyone’s business; all social actors must be involved in environmental management. Policies that implicitly subsidize a wasteful and environmentally destructive use of resources are pervasive: reforms should command a high priority on economic as well as environmental grounds.
  • Document

    Adjustment and Equity

    OECD Development Centre, 1992
    Adjustment does not necessarily increase poverty.Adjusting before a crisis reduces social costs.Refusal to adjust and the suspension of imports leads to self-centred underdevelopment, which is socially much more costly. The choice of macroeconomic stabilisation measures is important: the same result can be obtained with higher or lower social costs.

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