LANSA Film: Women in agriculture in South Asia: the nutrition connection

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Nutrition

Women, agriculture and the nutrition factor

In much of South Asia, women make up a majority of the agricultural workforce, but what effect does working in agriculture have on the nutrition of these women and their children?

Women working in their rice paddy fields in Odisha, India|Trocaire, Flickr, CC-BY
Edited by Sangeetha Rosemarie Rajeesh
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Across the world, women form an integral part of the agricultural sector. In much of South Asia, women make up a majority of the agricultural workforce, but the extent of their contribution often goes unrecognised. They undertake difficult physical labour - working long hours, and are paid lower wages compared to their male counterparts - if they are paid at all.

Research under the Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia programme in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India and Pakistan has identified women’s agricultural work in South Asia as a critical mediating factor between household poverty and undernutrition. The recognition of their work and women themselves as agricultural workers were identified as key entry points to leverage agriculture for improving nutrition.

Women’s work in agriculture and the implications for their health, and health of their children emerged as an important theme within LANSA research, revealing policy gaps and priorities to improve health and well-being of mothers and children in the region. Across the region, the steady feminisation of the agricultural workforce, has not been accompanied by nutritional improvement. LANSA research aimed to find out why.

Continue reading: It’s not just about food

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Jessica Meeker 

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It’s not just about food

There are a number of ways - some positive, some negative - in which agriculture can impact nutrition. The most obvious is through increasing the availability of nutritious foods, but there is also an effect through increasing incomes of the farmers and boosting consumption through lower relative prices of nutritious foods. The other key pathways are through women’s work in agriculture.

Women working as farmers may gain benefits such as increased income and economic empowerment may have a positive effect on nutrition through better food choices, however, the burden of work, which is often physically demanding may draw on their time thus compromising caring capacity and practices such as breastfeeding, preparing food and seeking health care. If the time and energy expended on additional work, especially during peak cultivation seasons, are not compensated adequately, women’s own health and nutrition might suffer. This may also have a negative consequence on the health and nutrition of their children.

Emerging evidence from Bangladesh indicates that growth of children depends on multidimensional factors, including maternal health and nutrition status and time for child care. Understanding of women’s role in the workforce and the implications for undernutrition has been a key research theme in both India and Pakistan. We found that many women agricultural workers are compelled to work in order to meet their families’ basic needs, but they are either unpaid or underpaid. Also, many of their activities are not recognised as work, by their communities, families, or even themselves. For example, a study in two rural districts in India showed that doing care work did not exempt women from productive labour in agriculture – their days were just busier. In peak agricultural seasons, women spend even more time in productive work, placing constraints on time for care, negatively affecting child and maternal nutrition. This leads to high levels of undernutrition, and seasonal losses in body weight, more severe for women who were already thin.

In Pakistan, a study conducted in rural areas of Sindh found that women who work in agriculture whilst pregnant are more likely to become malnourished and are also more likely to have malnourished children and children born low birth weight. However, the majority of women need to work whilst pregnant, with two out of every three rural mothers doing agricultural work while pregnant, and over a third undertaking physically demanding labour such as cotton harvesting. Women were acutely aware of the trade-off between their work and their children’s care, but many of them simply have no choice.

Continue reading: Same work, different wages

RECOMMENDED READING:

Women agricultural workers and nutrition in Pakistan
Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
Pakistan has high rates of child undernutrition (both stunting and wasting). The country’s agricultural sector is a source of livelihood for over 40 per cent of the workforce. The LANSA Evidence Review for Pakistan found that there had been steady feminisation of the agricultural workforce as men moved out of the sector and women remained. LANSA researchers resolved to examine these issues through a formative study of the impact of women’s agricultural work on their own health and the health and nutrition of their children.
Gender, agriculture, and nutrition in South Asia: conceptualising the links
Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
Even with higher economic growth and an overall reduction in poverty, there exists child undernutrition, maternal undernutrition and diverse forms of micro nutrient deficiencies – a phenomenon labelled as the South Asian Paradox. Eradicating undernutrition requires a dedicated effort to alleviating child undernutrition, as South Asia accounts for forty percent of the world’s undernourished children.
Agriculture and Nutrition in Pakistan – Pathways and Disconnects
Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2014
Results of the latest nationwide nutrition survey show that Pakistan has persistently high rates of undernutrition despite respectable rates of economic growth. Amongst economic sectors, agriculture could have positive impacts on nutrition outcomes, but only through nuanced approaches. Exploring possible links between agricultural growth and nutrition improvement in the country reveals that land, gender relations, individual behaviour and preferences, as well as political priorities and organisational effectiveness, act as disconnects between agriculture and nutrition.
Women’s agricultural work and nutrition in South Asia: From pathways to a cross-disciplinary, grounded analytical framework
Food Policy, 2019
This systematic review examines the impact of women’s work in agriculture on maternal and child nutrition in South Asia. Building on previous reviews supported under the Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia (LANSA) consortium, and recent published literature, it includes findings from new LANSA research. It maps literature on the gender-nutrition pathways linking agriculture to nutrition and points to conceptual and methodological directions for further exploration.

Same work, different wages

Women working in waged roles can contribute to female empowerment and better control over resources, which has a positive effect on nutrition. However, often women’s work in agriculture is unpaid, or if the work is paid, women’s wages are much lower than those paid to men.

Research in Pakistan showed that agricultural work was highly gendered. There were certain tasks and activities that were associated with men and others with women. Much of women’s agricultural work was unrecognised and unpaid. In some activities such as cotton harvesting where women were paid wages, their rates of pay were lower than men’s wages for comparable work. Women were acutely aware of the trade-off between their work and their children’s care, but many of them simply had no choice in the matter.

In most South Asian rural settings, women’s agricultural work appears to be driven by household poverty and marginality. Women from wealthier households tend to do less farm work, though with growing male out-migration, they are taking on farm management roles. Farm labourers are more likely to be from socially marginalised communities, given the negative association of women’s farm work with the social standing of a family. Women’s work in agriculture in most South Asian settings, therefore, is more likely to be due to a ‘distress sale of labour’ than empowered agency.

Continue reading: So what can be done?

RECOMMENDED READING:

Women agricultural workers and nutrition in Pakistan
Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
Pakistan has high rates of child undernutrition (both stunting and wasting). The country’s agricultural sector is a source of livelihood for over 40 per cent of the workforce. The LANSA Evidence Review for Pakistan found that there had been steady feminisation of the agricultural workforce as men moved out of the sector and women remained. LANSA researchers resolved to examine these issues through a formative study of the impact of women’s agricultural work on their own health and the health and nutrition of their children.
Women’s Agricultural Work and Nutrition in Pakistan: Findings from Qualitative Research
Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2015
Does women’s work in agriculture help or hinder nutrition in Pakistan? This question has assumed great significance due to the steady feminisation, over the last decade, of the agricultural labour force, and the absence of nutritional improvement in the same period. This exploratory paper builds upon the agriculture-nutrition pathways framework to propose an approach to individual or household-level decision-making in which the provision of care (for children and women) plays an important part in determining nutrition outcomes.

So what can be done?

Agriculture is the main livelihood for the majority of rural families in South Asia, and women play a very large role in the process with huge potential to reduce undernutrition, but this is yet to be realised.

Income generation and women’s empowerment are key drivers of better nutrition for women and their children, the key then is how to balance female participation in agriculture as waged employment, with the burden on their time and physically demanding nature of the work.

Policies which recognise female participation in agriculture are key, along with fair wages, fair working conditions and maternity benefits. Agricultural policies and programmes are often framed for the benefit of male farmers. Women agricultural workers, even when they are recognised as farmers, are peripheral to mainstream agricultural policies, despite the fact that they increasingly provide a large part of the low-paid labour, which sustains many agricultural activities. This is increasingly evident in the context of growing male out-migration from poor, rural communities.

Governments must create mechanisms for ensuring that at least some element of public subsidy reach women agricultural workers and recognise their contributions (women’s labour needs to be valued in calculating cost of cultivation and related support prices, and subsidies to crops such as cotton must entail wage support for workers).

Agricultural extension services need to be progressively feminised and engage with women farmers, and asset transfer programmes, including land transfers, must prioritise women beneficiaries.

Continue reading: Back to introduction

RECOMMENDED READING:

Gendered time, seasonality and nutrition: insights from two Indian districts
Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
Relatively few studies explore the links between women’s work in agriculture and nutritional outcomes. Using time use data from two Indian districts, this paper seeks to fill this gap.
Women in agriculture and nutrition in India
Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2016
Policy debates around agriculture and nutrition and the crucial role of women needs to be informed by evidence that research programmes like LANSA generate. The available evidence recommends the recognition of women’s roles in agriculture and nutrition.This Policy Brief looks at the following focus polices and programmes: Draft National Policy for Women 2016; National Policy for Empowerment of Women 2001; Supplementary Nutrition Programme under ICDS; National Nutrition Policy 1993; National Food Security Act 2013; National Policy for Farmers 2007.
Women’s agricultural work and nutrition in South Asia: policy priorities
Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
LANSA research has highlighted the linkage between women’s agricultural work and nutrition in South Asia. Official statistics acknowledge that agriculture accounts for a majority of women workers in these countries. Many women who work in agriculture, however, are not counted, and many others’ work is under-counted and often uncompensated. The division of agricultural activities is highly gendered and many of the tasks undertaken by women are not regarded as work by men and women, families and communities.
Women in agriculture and nutrition in Odisha, India
Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia, 2017
The Odisha State Policy for Girls and Women (2014) is a comprehensive document that seeks to create a state where girls and women are equal partners in development. It specifically focuses on: health and well-being, through ensuring survival, health and nutrition; and equal opportunities in all spheres of life, through livelihood support and promotion apart from equal opportunities for participation and leadership in all spheres of life.There are seven focus areas that provide a framework for operationalisation.